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Washington DC: 2133 by YNot1989 Washington DC: 2133 by YNot1989
The 87th Inauguration Day ceremonies came on the eve of the Second American Civil War, and as such the traditional celebration of national unity rang somewhat hollow to those in attendance. DC Police were on high alert to blockade the National Mall from the onslaught of demonstrators protesting the election of Lionel Halvidar, the first Colonial in history to win the Presidency. Halvidar, the longest serving Chairman of the Interplanetary Trade Commission, and advocated for the integration of the colonies into the Union, was seen by many as the greatest possible threat to the way of life of American citizens in the Southwest who feared colonial integration would rob them of what little representation they held in the Congress. This prompted four Southwestern states to secede from the Union before Halvidar ever took office, and Vice President Castillo's defection to the rebel states.

While Halvidar was seen as the devil to the Southwest, to the rest of the country he was the least worst option in one of the most divisive elections in history. Halvidar's calls for adopting the Quantum Economic Model on Earth and funding major civil works projects from colonial coffers were the only things that made the citizens on Earth accept the notion of Colonial integration. The United States, like much of the Earth, was suffering mass unemployment, an overburdened social welfare system, and record deficits, while its colonies in space enjoyed a post-scarcity standard of living made possible by a system-wide trade network and administrative body. With so many troubles on Earth, the voters were willing to give Halvidar and the Colonial Way a try. Many were experiencing buyer's remorse by inauguration day.

Washington DC was filled with supporters, protesters, and attendees, ready to hear what the 65th President of the United States would have to say about the present state of affairs. This city, built on a swamp, burned by the British, attacked by terrorists, drowned by Floodwaters, besieged by Japanese and Turkish drones, drained and rebuilt during the Refreeze, all the while presiding over the political discourse of the World's oldest Republic, still stood as the place where humanity looked to when the world was on the brink. It now shared that position with Mexico City, and in the Colonies it shared it with Bradbury as well. Halvidar made it very clear in his address that this would not be the way of things to come, that the Union, divided more than ever, would be reforged as a single entity. That the colonies would finally know the representation they'd so long been denied, that the economic prosperity of the colonies would finally come to Earth, and that the US would restore union on Earth even while it expands it to space.
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:iconfreedim:
Freedim Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2016
Is there an Obama Park for the Obama's like there's Clinton Park for the Clinton's?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
He got an executive office building.
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:iconfreedim:
Freedim Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2016
Ah. So where are they buried? Back in Illinois?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I unno. I'm toying with the idea of scrapping the Clinton park entirely from the map, since their legacy (barring a final hail mary by the electoral college) is pretty much over at this point.
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:iconfreedim:
Freedim Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2016
Or you could replace it with the Obama park I suggested 
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
True.
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:iconmenapia:
menapia Featured By Owner Nov 6, 2016
Quantum Economic Model ?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
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:iconmenapia:
menapia Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2016
Cheers - interesting ideas it's not a perfect world like in some utopia but the storyline has a more optimistic view than most
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:icontwisterace:
TwisterAce Featured By Owner Sep 15, 2016
Pretty cool map. It's interesting to see the new buildings that have been built along the National Mall. It also looks like parts of West and East Potomac Park have been replaced with new development (e.g. Jacobi Row).

Seeing this map has me wondering: how is urban planning/development in this future? Have highways or railways in urban areas been moved underground? Any major changes to city layouts due to technological or societal advances? What types of mass transit systems are available?

I recall reading that suburbia receded following the 2020s economic crisis and that by the 22nd century there are rewilding efforts turning former suburban land back over to nature. So it sounds like the population is living more densely in the cities.
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Sep 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Urban planning is entirely automated. City Managers have been replaced with Custodian AIs that zone and rezone areas as needed and conduct urban planning based on foot and road traffic, weather, proximity to schools, hospitals, tourist areas, etc. Above ground roads haven't gone away, people still like to look at things while they drive, and its just easier to build above ground than below it. There are more subterranean roads and rail-lines (mostly hyperloop/vactrain lines in cities), and aboveground roads have stopped getting wider as driverless cars eliminated the "Traffic Snake" problem (www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHzzSa…) so more space is dedicated for foot-traffic, which is easier as automated city planning intentionally zones in such away to where a person could conceivably walk anywhere they need to go to meet their immediate needs. And that's if you don't already live in an arcology.
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:icontwisterace:
TwisterAce Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2016
Have automation and other tech advances made it easier and faster to construct/demolish buildings?

Also how prevalent are arcologies? They seem like they'd be common on Mars and other extraterrestrial worlds.
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes, automation has made it easier and faster to build and tear down buildings. And arcologies are actually pretty common off-Earth, and while not as common on Earth, there are still quite a few of them. They're integrated into the city like a normal skyscraper (like the megablocks in Dredd), though some of the older ones are on small islands or at sea (built by billionaires who weren't wild about the Price Administration's economic reforms in the 2030s, and only a couple aren't dilapidated ruins by 2133). They range in quality and population density from high density bare bones buildings like the Mega Blocks from Dredd, to more middle-class, medium density buildings which have parks and better lighting (honestly they're the most common), and then there are the ones that are basically the domes from Big O (on Mars there are quite a few ACTUAL domes that were used by the early setters as self-contained environments, and are now used either as administrative centers or are treated as the historic districts of major cities.)

On Mars and later Venus, there are very few traditional skyscrapers. Basically once you get past 5 stories, it jumps to an arcology. The cities are all planned out with virtually no infill, and extremely dense (with New Richmond being one of the few exceptions to this given its status as the planet's greatest sea and spaceport).
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:icontwisterace:
TwisterAce Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2016
Are traditional skyscrapers still common on Earth?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
They're far and away more common than arcologies. Its a real-estate thing, that and skyscrapers make mores sense under the more traditionally capitalist economic systems of the Earth. Individuals and corporations want buildings to call their own. Arcologies are built to serve communities.
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:icontwisterace:
TwisterAce Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2016
Thanks for answering my questions.
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
np
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:iconvault-avatar:
Vault-Avatar Featured By Owner Sep 14, 2016
I just noticed, and I'm unsure if its significant, the absence of the Museum of African American History, across Constitution Ave. from the Dept. of Commerce, next to the National Museum of American History. It's opening this month (our time). It doesn't seem to have been moved like Martin Luther King Jr.'s memorial was. Just curious about that.
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Sep 14, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'm almost certain I responded to this already, but it was not included on the base map I used for this, and as such it got lost in the creation of this map.
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yep! Good find.
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:iconnealman11:
NealMan11 Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2016
What is the population of Mars at this point in history?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
little over 3 billion.
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:iconmtt3008:
MTT3008 Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016
I think I may have asked this before on another map, but how is the Quantum Economic Model defined?

Also, really cool looking map. ^.=.^
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
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:iconsulpsulk:
sulPSulk Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2016
It feels like an odd estrangement, for me, to have it be the case that the "colonial masters" and the "colonists", while still having maintained their relative political positions, have pretty much swapped places economically.

Not a criticism of this idea; I think it's interesting to think of it as being the case since it's like a blank slate, so it would probably become a reality that the people who start out anew are able to work up a better system to prepare for the erasure of most labour compared to the people living in what must ostensibly still be a place with a far more divisive political landscape. (If only because there are/were different countries running different parts of the world)
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:iconelsqiubbonator:
Is there any risk that one day the extraterrestrial colonies might decide to leave the Union, just as the southwestern states attempted to? You know, sort of like what happened to the British Empire--it eventually got SO big and SO powerful that it couldn't hold itself together?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
There will no doubt be colonies that try, and some may even succeed. But to my mind the United States has finally done what nation-states have been trying to do for the last 700 years and transitioned to a post-Westphalian order. Another way to look at it is that the US is turning into a prototypical version of "The Culture." 
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:iconelsqiubbonator:
ElSqiubbonator Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016
Neat!
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:icontwiggierjet:
Twiggierjet Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2016
So why do those southwestern states think integrating the colonies is a threat to their way of life?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
There are 3 billion colonials. There are 600 million Americans living on Earth, and only about 200 million in the Southwestern states. The only reason the Southwest has been able to maintain the quasi-autonomous status they enjoyed where they're both kinda citizens of Mexico AND the United States is because they have just barely enough people to offer a credible threat in the Congress against any legislative agenda aimed at ending that status. But if 3 billion people are given the same rights under state representation, rather than treated as living in territories, their voices would be drowned out and it would take barely any effort to end the quasi-autonomous state system.
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:icontwiggierjet:
Twiggierjet Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2016
3 Billion? How did the US colonies get that many people? Did they take over everyone else's colonies before this happened?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Its a vestigial policy of ITAR. Basically when Mars exploration got started, the US was doing it basically on their own though private companies like SpaceX who made a lot of money through defense contracts over the Little Cold War. So basically because their technology could be weaponize, they could not allow non-US citizens to fly on them. During the exploration of Mars and the first days of colonization this wasn't a huge problem because only scientists and engineers were going and a handful of very wealthy individuals. Then in the 2030s the H1B Visa was liberalize that basically let anyone become a citizen if they had a valuable skill that the country needed OR if they were being hired by a major technology company. All colonists leaving for Mars technically were employees of MarsCorp or its affiliates and subsidiaries. Again, not a huge problem for a long time; prior to the opening of Mars to all non-terraforming/exploration/industry workers if you moved to Mars there was a 70% chance you were already a US citizen. But when the immigration reforms and border closures of the 2080s kicked in, an amendment was added that essentially grandfathered all the pre-reform rules in for people leaving Earth. The Federal Government would just assign US citizenship to these people, despite the fact that MarsCorp was dissolved to make way for the ITC, because to people on Earth it was just a formality, and to the tens of millions of people already living in the colonies you were basically an American to begin with if you were making the move to Mars (in the sense that you're an immigrant seeking a new life in the literal New World). 

As for everyone else, there were no colonies outside of the Moon that weren't controlled by the US. America was the only nation with the technology to get large numbers of people to Mars, and by the time everyone else caught up the US had basically declared "Dibbs" on the whole planet.
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:icontwiggierjet:
Twiggierjet Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2016
I imagine that there was quite a bit of immigration to mars happening because a lot of places were getting messed up by climate change and such.
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yup, but it didn't have anything on the immigration boom in the 2080s. The global economy went off the deep end in the late 70s as general purpose robots and Artificial Intelligence Operating Systems put the bulk of the human workforce out of a job, over a Billion people left for Mars between 2080 and 2120, and they bred like jackrabbits when they got there. 
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:iconfreedim:
Freedim Featured By Owner Edited Aug 22, 2016
In his address he should include his notion that 'America' is now more of an idea, not a physical territory.
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I stated in other posts that he does.
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:iconastraeuscentral:
AstraeusCentral Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2016
Quick question, where exactly is the Halvidar Memorial located following the end of the conflict?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Edited Aug 22, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Originally I was thinking on the national Mall between 75th and 9th Street, but now maybe near the Tidal Basin or on the West Front capitol Grounds. I was thinking that it could be a victory arch if its on the Mall.
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:iconkingwillhamii:
2133 and still no WW1 memorial in DC... Still, this is a cool map.
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