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Mars 2099: Second Wave by YNot1989 Mars 2099: Second Wave by YNot1989

Humanity is divided on Earth, but they are United in the Colonies. Well, in theory anyway. Following the First Martian Revolution, Mars and her smaller sister colonies have blossomed as symbols of peace and prosperity. With the establishment of the Interplanetary Trade Commission in 2086 in Bradbury, resources flow between the colonies on quantum calculated schedules. Basic needs are met by the ITC, food, water, housing, and base resources. Compilers enable everyone to produce consumer goods at home with nary a thought. Capitalism in the colonies is comfortable at the margins, driving entrepreneurs to build a steady economy. Great cities, erected during terraforming, housed over a billion people on Mars, and the first space elevators at New Richmond and Skyport bring in new people every day. The lush Margaritifer Lowlands and the Hesiod Gulf Colonies are home to the largest concentration of people, but the smaller pseudo-states (territories in the eyes of the US on Earth) can be found in pockets across the planet. Be they long time American citizens, fleeing Mexican expatriates looking to stay in their adopted country, or Eurasians and Africans just looking for a better life, Mars and the rest of the colonies have become the homes of a second wave of pioneers, refugees and heros.

With the Rosalind Amendment, and a rubber stamp of approval from Congress, the colonies had the sense of unity and inclusion that was essential to stave off civil war, while allowing Earth to worry about what is wrong with Earth… at least that was the plan anyway. In practice, the Rosalind Amendment became a way for Earth to dump any problems they didn’t want to deal with on the colonies. Many of those new residents were Mexican expatriates looking to avoid deportation to Mexico and Central America. In 2093 the Tel-bn people requested asylum after the near destruction of their species following a decades long nuclear conflict. The United States on Earth refused their claim for resettlement on Earth, but per the Rosalind Amendment, the colonies could oblige them. When Earth finds a new way to discriminate against some poor souls, they find their way to the colonies; when prisons are overcrowded, they find their way to the colonies; and when some backwards regime fails, and exile is the last option, they find their way to the colonies. Generally these problems are handled reasonably well. Prisoners and exiles, tend to look at life in the colonies as a clean start, and don’t fall back into bad habits as easily, and the colonies are often the birthplace for many subcultures Earth doesn’t approve of, so they’re happy to take in people considered just a little too odd for polite society on Earth. Washington’s problems are usually taken care of with minimal effort from Bradbury, its getting the capital to reciprocate that’s the problem.

The Guardiola Foundation, a radical anti-colony faction of the aristocratic Mediterranean Union, had been antagonizing the Earth-Luna colonies for many years. Banning the sale of goods imported from the colonies, publishing Terran nativist propaganda, and in some cases attacking civilian spacecraft. In early 2099, the Guardiolas staged a major series of strikes on several Lagrangian and Lunar colonies. Deploying armored infantrymen and support drones against civilian militias. When the colonial governments, resident commissioners and the ITC all called on the Federal Government for help, they were met with deaf ears. As the Mediterranians are an ally of Mexico, and the Guardiolas are only a rogue faction, the US government on Earth refused to get involved directly as it would drive the US and Mexico to war after concluding one in South America only a few years earlier. The colonies were on their own. Mars was quick to send volunteers from its Colonial Guard forces, and the outer planets were not far behind, but by the time reinforcements arrived to put down the Guardiolas, over 100,000 people had been killed in combat or from decompression. It was only from the pleads of the ITC commissioner, often known as “the Other President,” that the colonies did not strike the Guardiola stronghold in Catalonia. The US government, in a desire to save face with its colonies, who had now positioned a very angry force of some 20,000 seasoned space warriors in orbit above Earth, launched a coordinated strike on the Guardiola Foundation’s headquarters, and issued joint warrants with the MU and Mexico for the arrest of its surviving members. This got the colonies to stand down, but they would not forget the betrayal by their own government.



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:iconthetexasranger:
TheTexasRanger Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2014
So how many "states" are there on Mars?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Still working on it, but for now lets say a few hundred.
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:icontwisterace:
TwisterAce Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2014
Since Mars has a surface gravity about one-third that of the Earth, how has this affected humans and other creatures living/born on the planet? Likewise for other celestial bodies?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Humans have gotten around the problems of low gravity through genetic manipulation, but the organisms tailored to live on Mars were created to exploit the lower gravity, where Humans augmented themselves to handle conditions on a variety of worlds, maintaining their basic appearance and bio-mechanical conditions. Martian animals tend to be larger and often lankier than their earth cousins, and flight is an ability given to a wider variety of organisms than on Earth.
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:iconmicrowavedreams:
Are aliens and sentient machines considered citizens of the United states? Do they see themselves as Americans, one of many waves of immigrants? How integrated are they in society, and how many of them are there by 2130?

Also, the US may have a ban on other countries having military activities in space, but surely other nations participated in non violent colonization of the solar system..? Or is everything off earth American? (besides Mexico later on)
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
They were by the 2090s in some cases, but creating sentient programs were banned by the US Congress at the turn of the century. There are a few thousand androids created with neural nets that were essentially copied from human connectomes who eventually developed sentience on their own; they were granted citizenship, but its illegal to create new ones, this is after a constitutional amendment that granted rights to all citizens regardless of corporeal form. Despite these rights, Alien and AI citizens still have a pretty rough time even by the 2130s. Earth is downright racist (speciesist?) toward aliens these days; they don't even let them live on Earth outside of diplomatic embassies; and depending on which planet you're on it isn't much better in the colonies. The Tel-bn, a cephelapod like species that showed up in the 2090s, are largely accepted on Triton and the Jovians where they settled in the largest numbers, but Martians fucking HATE them. Most other aliens have only come in comparatively small numbers. The K'lerin of Tau Ceti f only have a few dozen of their people living in the Sol system, and the Voknach (more or less humanoid looking reptilians) are generally accepted outside of Mars and Earth. Mars and Earth tend to be much more protectionist about their worlds, Earth out of traditionalism, Mars out of some sense that Mars is "Humanity's second home," and not to be sullied by non humans. The AI Rights movement actually started on Tharsis, and was responded to by brutal attack on AI citizens.

So yeah, non-humans have all the same legal rights as their human neighbors, but its kinda like being black in America in the 1970s, or Gay in the 2000s. The fact that by 2130 some non-humans serve in the US armed forces, has certainly ruffled some feathers.

And no, the US has been alone in space colonization since WWIII. The Japanese had a series of moon colonies, but after WWIII the US was having none of that and annexed them. ITAR was used as the main excuse to keep non-Americans from flying to Mars in large quantities. The US was one of the few countries with the capability, and the only one with the resources to make large scale space colonization possible anyway. With the exception of a handful of research and manufacturing satellites, Space belongs to America, though the vast majority of people living in space by the turn of the century, were not actually born in America. They're all immigrants, so in a way you could say other nations did colonize space. Mexico has found a way around this with their Orbitals (which are also military platforms).
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:iconminecrafroger:
minecrafroger Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
so, on Earth and Mars it's simmlure to un-offical Jim-Alien laws (bad history/sifi jokes).
i'm not surprise, did you see how we treated our own kind in the colonial era and even today.
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:iconvaldulan:
Valdulan Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2014
Do the colonies have nuclear weapons?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Sort of. They use microfusion devices for geo-engineering projects (mostly for hollowing out new habitats beneath the Galilean Moons), and they produce anti-matter around Saturn to fuel the largest of the O'Neil ships, but it's all carefully monitored by the Space Force, NASA, and the US Department of Energy. It's one of the areas of the colonies activities that they have very little control over.
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:iconvaldulan:
Valdulan Featured By Owner Jul 12, 2014
So, when do things go to Hell? Because, frankly, something that's too perfect makes for a very poor narrative. Since Earth seems more realistic and generally more vibrant, I'm thinking it should win when the two sides inevitably duke it out?

Can a united Earth effort bring Mars to its knees?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Jul 12, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Continue onto the Second Martian Revolution, and you'll see there is indeed a struggle. And you've got it backwards. Earth cannot unite under the present circumstances, only the colonies have a chance of saving Earth from itself.
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:iconvaldulan:
Valdulan Featured By Owner Jul 12, 2014
So the colonies have a very bad case of Hubris?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Jul 12, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Eh, more like a long standing series of abandonment issues punctuated by one moment of pride. 2132 saw the election of the Chairman of the ITC to the Presidency, so the colonies had their leader now running the whole country, and stood a real chance of full integration into the Union. Prior to that Earth basically ignored the colonies, and often dumped problems they didn't want to deal with on the colonies. Check out the rest of my work in this timeline to gain a better understanding of what's happening..
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:iconvaldulan:
Valdulan Featured By Owner Jul 14, 2014
Actually, the way this is phrased and written, the Colonies have done nothing but good moves, Earth nothing but bad moves. When something's too good, it becomes utterly boring. At least Earth flawed as it is, isn't boring.

So when the Earth-Colonial Wars happen, I'm rooting for the Earth. Its more interesting than the Colonies are, so I think a win by them would be more interesting by far.
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Jul 14, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The colonies aren't perfect, but they've spent the majority of their history just trying to build their worlds from scratch, they haven't had time to be politically active until very recently. And I'll admit I did skip some colonial history just to try and move the narrative toward the war on Earth. The Second Renaissance's theme will become clear upon the conclusion of the series, after that I'll spend some time filling in the blanks with some smaller maps.
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:iconvaldulan:
Valdulan Featured By Owner Jul 14, 2014
If Earth goes all out, the colonies don't stand the shadow of a chance. Which is why I can't wait for Earth to go all out. I want to see to what extent Earth on the warpath can pound them.
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:iconmicrowavedreams:
microwavedreams Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2014
What are Martian cities like? Do they still follow the "dome" style? Or do they look more like standard Earth cities with skyscrapers and whatnot. How have Earth cities evolved for that matter?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Mars's first cities (Bradbury, Heinline, Spirit, Curiosity, etc.) all have huge domes where the first colonists lived prior to the atmosphere and magnetic field becoming stable. As the planet became more habitable, normal skyscrapers became the norm. The domes are usually used as government buildings and museums these days. On Earth, and much more so on Mars, cities are more concentrated, as suburbs became urbanized with the influx of climate refugees and new citizens in the 2030s and 40s, or were simply washed away as they were on the coasts. Skyscrapers are built far larger now, and are essentially self contained towns. That style of building is much more common on Mars though, where on Earth, the sprawl is more common as it is very expensive to build supertowers.
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:iconmdc01957:
mdc01957 Featured By Owner May 29, 2014
Why do I get a feeling that the Rosalind Amendment was named after a certain Edwardian female researcher from 1912?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner May 29, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Nope. Its just a name that I thought sounded cool that I applied to a hypothetical future congressperson who would author the bill.
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:iconmdc01957:
mdc01957 Featured By Owner May 29, 2014
Ah, I see. Though from the map (Apparently Elon Musk's old purchases are now immortalized)  and even the flag, it sounds like Mars is nominally US Territory. 
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner May 29, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Territories. Though they are fairly self governing, and have a LOT of resident commissioners in Congress.
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:iconmdc01957:
mdc01957 Featured By Owner May 29, 2014
Ah, I see. That makes sense.
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:iconmicrowavedreams:
microwavedreams Featured By Owner May 29, 2014
I understand how humanity rushed into space so rapidly and began to terraform mars and other planets so quickly, but my question is why?
What drove mankind to immediately begin terraforming and colonizing mars so quickly from the first landings?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner May 29, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Why did we rush to colonize the new world? Europe wasn't exactly overcrowded at the time. Because, there was money to be made. The Mars Corporation was founded to profit from resources, real estate, and potential trade from across the system that would all flow through Mars. Humans initially only settled it in the millions to work as terraforming staff. Once it was declared habitable, hundreds of millions flooded into Mars to take advantage of a new life, on a new frontier. Earth wasn't doing so hot by the 2080s, and a portion of the population saw the colonies as a chance for a better life.
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:iconalpha-dilophosaurus:
Alpha-Dilophosaurus Featured By Owner May 29, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
this The Best Mars map I have see weird that there are lots that have prehistoric animals on mars I have do this to alpha-dilophosaurus.deviantart… and alpha-dilophosaurus.deviantart… keep up the good work.
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:iconmicrowavedreams:
microwavedreams Featured By Owner May 28, 2014
How terraformed exactly is Mars at this point? And whats the status of the biosphere, at least in the more inhabited areas? And I'm immensely curious about the Tel-bn. General size? Appearance? etc
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner May 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The planet is habitable, but not complete. The trees are very young, the topsoil hasn't completely taken across the planet. Most of the terrain is still desert by Earth standards. The lowlands around the Hesiod Gulf and Margartifer are extremely lush and fertile, though young. If you get into the highlands around Tharsis and the interior, you'll think you're still on Mars before humans settled it (with the exception of the blue sky and the much larger moons,with the soil is more like that of the American south west, non-toxic, but not much grows there yet. In the lowlands there are green fields and meadows; small forests (the largest forest on the planet is on Elysium and its not much bigger than the Black Forest in Germany.)

Every single organism on Mars is genetically engineered. You'll find similar species, and might confuse an Elysian Fir or a Hellenic Cypress for their terran counterparts (save for the fact that they grow much taller and more narrow, with leaves that are almost black), but all the flora and fauna are bred to live and thrive on Mars. The corals and trees are veined with the iron found in the soil of the planet, and the seas and land are dotted with creatures engineered based on long dead organisms from Earth's past changed to better fit the new world, or simply be more pleasing to human eyes, but all of them are either tame toward humans, or instinctively try to flee from them.

The Tel-bn are a cepholapod-like race, normally standing about 1.4 meters tall, that can contort their bodies to resemble just about anything (think mimic octopus). They have a definite head, midsection and manipulator limbs, but are very alien looking to humans. They don't need much more water than humans do to survive, and have long since become totally land dwelling, but to be more pleasing to humans they contort their muscles to produce a more human looking head and torso, wear human tops, and even wigs. They look almost cartoonish, and thus are largely accepted by humanity at large (at least in the colonies). For the last 24 Standard Years the Tel-bn have been fighting an apocalyptic war on their home world, that was largely concluded by nuclear weapons when humans arrived (the radiation spike from this is what alerted humanity to its presence). While the fighting mostly ended four years ago, a few factions remain, but the majority of the planet is so utterly decimated, that humans have directly taken over large portions of the world (at the behest of its inhabitants) to clean and rebuild their civilization.
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:icontwisterace:
TwisterAce Featured By Owner May 28, 2014
I smell another Martian revolution on the horizon...

What are the rest of the colonies in the Solar System like? And since humans have developed FTL spacecraft, have they settled any other star systems, or are they still just exploring?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner May 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oh, and yes, humans have begun to settle nearby star systems, but it is VERY slow going, given the limits to what they can transport aboard FTL ships. So for now, there's a few thousand geo-engineers terraforming worlds nearby systems, and some large asteroids are being converted into O'Neil ships the size of Long Island to transport colonists in Cryo, but these missions will take decades. 
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner May 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
By 2100 have colonized (in large numbers anyway, there are countless O'Neil Cylinder ship and Ring colonies made from harvested asteroids.) Luna, Ceres (now Venus's moon), Ganymede, Callisto, Europa, Titan, Triton, and a number of small moons and Pluto/Charon, have bases on them, but no real cities. Venus has a few hundred thousand geo-engineers terraforming it, but its not fit for colonization yet, and Phobos and Demos are still cooling after they were expanded to improve Mars's magnetic field.
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:iconsamsquared:
SamSquared Featured By Owner May 28, 2014  Student
Two questions: I'm curious as to how you divided up the land as Mars lacks many obvious boundaries - was there a method or was it more-or-less arbitrary?
Are there political/social/ethic/cultural/ideological differences extant or emerging between various territories?

Also just like to say I am loving this timeline...I've been working on my own for the past few years and come to some radically divergent conclusions, but there are also interesting overlaps - but what makes it most interesting to me is to see such a detailed, well thought out timeline that diverges from my own despite starting with the same data (today being the POD :) ). I don't think I know of any others on this site that are this well done
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner May 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks for the compliment.

NASA has some mighty detailed photographs of the surface that I used, and tried to follow hills, valleys, river beads, and mountain ranges as best I could. You'll notice there are very few straight lines along the equator, that's because I figured it would be prime real estate for space elevators. As for cultural divisions, that hasn't been a problem as much as you'd think. While there are some cultural differences between each Territory, Mars wasn't just engineered to sustain life, it was engineered to sustain a planet wide civilization. Humans who sign up to move to Mars are settled with their families and a few friends, but they are intentionally mixed into large groups of people of varying backgrounds and cultures, with an effort to maintain a "Americanized," plurality. Every city, rail-line, and roadway was built with this goal of planetary cohesiveness in mind, all planned out for decades by quantum computer. Mars might experience a minor uprising, riot, or political extremist movement from time to time, but the level of inter-connectivity is designed to ensure that the planet will NEVER break up into the same fractious problems of Earth.
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:iconsamsquared:
SamSquared Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2014  Student
No problem.
Makes a lot of sense if they are all part of some blurred mass migration from Earth, like that from Europe to America. To enhance cohesion they might emphasise their collective 'Martian-ness'  although that would probably lead to calls for outright secession/independence for Mars down the line.
I was wondering - in this timeline for heavily populated countries like China and India to still be behind America, Mexico or, even more extreme, Poland, economic growth must have been pretty abysmal over the 21st century. Or is there another explanation for example significant population redistribution? Do you have any idea of roughly what the figures would be for the major players in terms of economic power and population?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
What makes Brazil, Poland, and Mexico such major players compared to more populous countries like China and India, is that while their populations and economies are individually dwarfed by them, the alliance structures they've crafted make them more powerful as a whole. Poland isn't a leading economy on its own, the whole Intermarium is, as is the case with the Brazilian and Mexican sphere's. China is geographically isolated, and blocked by Japan and Korea (two powers with less than a loving relationship towards China), and India has the same problem. the Intermarium has limited access to the seas, Brazil can't expand much beyond western Africa, but Mexico has ports in the Atlantic and the Pacific (just like the US) a large monolingual sphere of influence at home and numerous allies abroad. They are in a very good position to cause problems for the US.

The largest individual economies are (with respect to population):

  1. USA: 672m
  2. China: 816m
  3. Mexico: 335m
  4. India: 1,147m
  5. Brazil: 244m
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:iconsamsquared:
SamSquared Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2014  Student
Ah I see - this makes much more sense - having spheres of influence and the ability to project power is vital (the British Empire completely dominated geopolitics despite not being vastly economically superior to a number of its contemporaries). Without the vastly expanded territory enjoyed by the US in this timeline I can see China becoming the top economy, but struggle to imagine how it could ever become a global hyperpower largely due to the problems you mentioned. India could potentially create a sphere of influence including it's immediate neighbours and countries fringing the Indian Ocean but I feel you are probably right in not having this happen in your timeline given preceding events. I am also in complete agreement with your predictions regarding politics between Brazil, Mexico and the USA - to me it actually feels that this is one of the few predictable logical outcomes for geopolitics in the Western Hemisphere over the coming century. It seems harder to perceive how tensions between Mexico and the US could ever be resolved - any ideas? Or will I have to wait for a future map? ;)
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The next map will be entitled: 2132: Flashpoint, if that gives you any ideas.
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:iconsamsquared:
SamSquared Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2014  Student
Haha OK well I look forward to it
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:iconscarfield:
Scarfield Featured By Owner May 28, 2014
Your maps keep on improving! Does the Guardiola Found. ideology have support of the MU and Mexico, or just the 80s Mujahideens of this era? And if so, are there other nations that are active sympathizers of GF or have similar movements as major political players? P.S.: Did not see Sabishii before now, nice! No Grand Canal though...
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner May 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The Guardiolas are supported by Mexico through unofficial channels within the MU. Mexico isn't opposed to space colonization, so much as they're opposed to American monopolization of the colonies. There is no Grand canal, but there are river systems that run between the major bodies of water.
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:iconscarfield:
Scarfield Featured By Owner Jun 30, 2014
Btw: Are there any major aspect of the enviromental red/green/blue-divide from the Mars trilogy present in Martian politics, and do you have plans for other colony maps for example of the Moon, Venus or the Jovians?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Not really' you didn't move to Mars if you weren't interested in terraforming it. There are a few psuedo "hippies," but they're harmless and very much ignored. The Martian political culture is mostly divided between rural farming communities and the major cities, and isn't really that different from the political divisions you seen in almost every society on Earth. The only real wedge issues were AI rights, Alien citizenship, and the biggest one being Integration within the Union.

I'll do a Venus and moon map one of these days, but I am not even going to attempt a map of the Jovians just yet.
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:iconsoaringaven:
SoaringAven Featured By Owner May 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Morava :3

Also, awesome pic and backstory! :D
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:icontwiggierjet:
Twiggierjet Featured By Owner May 28, 2014
So the Guardiola foundation now wants to prevent any space colonisation whatsoever? Nice job BTW.
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner May 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
They want to reverse the trend of colonies growing in power.
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:icontwiggierjet:
Twiggierjet Featured By Owner May 28, 2014
Any particular ideological reason or foreign government reducing competition?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner May 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Ideologically, they believe in a neo-chivalric social order out of some desire to preserve the cultures of Europe (which they claim is dying, cause it kinda is by this point). Unofficially, Mexico funds them to curb America's access to the goods and resources of its colonies.
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:iconheliosmegistos:
HeliosMegistos Featured By Owner May 28, 2014
Nice map, are the Tel-bn people aliens btw ?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner May 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes, cephalopods.
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:iconheliosmegistos:
HeliosMegistos Featured By Owner May 28, 2014
Interesting, it must have taken them ages to get to Sol if they don't have FTL.
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