Shop More Submit  Join Login
×




Details

Submitted on
August 26, 2012
Image Size
6.5 MB
Resolution
2692×2152
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
4,066 (1 today)
Favourites
38 (who?)
Comments
43
Downloads
46
×
Border Control by YNot1989 Border Control by YNot1989
Houghton Mifflin Social Studies
========================================

Chapter 16: The Mexico Problem
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
While the United States enjoyed an era of unprecedented prosperity during the 2060s and 70s following the end of the Third World War and the immigration reform policies of the 30s, the immigration issue had not been completely resolved.

Immigrants from Asia and Africa had long since assimilated and added their heritage to American society, however on the country's southern border immigrants from Mexico had largely retained their cultural identity and never truly assimilated with contemporary American culture. In the South-Western states, Spanish was the dominant language, Mexican traditions were exclusively observed over American ones, and the region's citizens were behaving more and more like people living under an occupying power rather than in a new country.

This problem was made all the more distressing with Mexico's rise as a major power. The country had largely avoided involvement in the Third World War, but its proximity to the United States and status as a transcontinental power with access to both oceans allowed for both an economic and population boom, making Mexico the second largest economy in the world by the 2080s, surpassing Japan. With this new Status Mexico found itself stretching its legs and forming trading alliances with the rest of the world, in some cases exclusively with Latin American powers which were also on the rise.

By the end of the 21st Century Mexico had instituted a series of policies granting people of Mexican decent living abroad representation in the Mexican Congress, and the right to vote in Presidential elections, effectively making them duel-citizens. This inexorably led to many American Southwestern states formalizing Mexico's policies and enforcing Mexican laws (many of which actually coincided with American law). A Mexicanos Libres party is eventually formed to represent the interests of Mexican Americans exclusively.

By the 2080s the immigration reforms are reversed to deal with rampant unemployment due to new technologies that extend the life of workers, and replace human labor with computers/robotics. This is most devastating in the South West, where many residents have never actually become US citizens.

By the 22nd Century, admits growing calls for autonomous status from Southwestern states, the President deploys the US military to close the border and begin deportation of resident-aliens who are largely of Mexican ancestry. The Governor of New Mexico deploys the New Mexico State National Guard to its borders to prevent the Army from entering their territory, refusing to honor the deportation act. A battle breaks out in the town of Shiprock resulting in the deaths of some 700 New Mexican National Guardsmen, and 300 members of the US Army. New Mexico secedes from the Union the next day. Arizona follows shortly thereafter as well as Texas and California. East Texas breaks off from Texas proper to stay in the union as the new state of Jacinto, as does Northern California. The Oklahoma Panhandle secedes from the union and joins in the partitioned Texas as the new State of Lamar.

Mexico itself formally recognizes the new nation of Aztlan on February 19th 2113, and commits military aid to the secessionists. The United States declares war on Mexico and vows to bring the rebel states back into the Union at any cost.

**This scenario was derived from the scenarios predicted by STRATFOR founder, and geopolitical/economic analyst George Friedman. I did my best to illustrate his very interesting scenario which you can read about in great detail in his books: "The Next 100 Years," and the "Next Decade
Add a Comment:
 
:icontallestskil:
TallestSkil Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2014
lol, no. Ever.
Reply
:iconmenapia:
menapia Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014
Interesting timeline and original.  In the book "Warday" by Whitley Strieber and James Kunetka the authors do a travelogue of the U.S after a war like in your timeline and the main character does a tour of a country called Atzlan where the old Mexican territories and Navaho reserves break off and start their own republic.  When you look at old maps or collect old coins or banknotes you spot that things always change.  Brilliant timeline again
Reply
:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Not really my timeline, just an extrapolation of the chain of events presented in Dr. Friedman's book "The Next 100 Years."


Reply
:iconmenapia:
menapia Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014

good work anyhow


Reply
:iconturtledove23:
turtledove23 Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014
I have read George Friedman's book "The Next 100 Years" and found it an interesting read, although the thought of Poland as any sort of power  struck me as odd, then again like George said at the beginning of the book, who thought in the year 1900 that America of all countries would not only be a world power, but a super power that would have complete control over all the world's seas and be able to export it's culture and language through the media to every corner of the earth. But on to the scenario, I have a couple of questions if you don't mind

1. Due to these regions succeeding from the United States due to the Hispanic population living there wanting to have a land where their culture and language would be dominant do you see any mobs of American attacking Hispanics in other parts of America?
2. Would the succeeding regions have any sort of ethnic cleansing being committed against non Hispanic peoples in those areas under rebel control?
3. I saw in another post here that the U.S. has control of the Caribbean, when did that happen, I don't exactly remember that in the book? 
Reply
:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
1.) Yep
2.) Yep.
3.) Friedman mentions briefly that the Battlestars could be used to secure new territory for the US, and in the STRATFOR Geographic Challenge updates they mention that Cuba and the Caribbean is critical to American interests because of the amount of agro trade (and now natural gas) that flows from the Mississippi to European and Asian Markets through the Caribbean.
Reply
:iconkraut007:
Kraut007 Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2014
Usually its all about Mexico gets its old territories back or the US conquers even more in the south.
But am own state of the Mexican Americans? That a interesting idea, especially if you consider, that Mexican Americans will be the majority in Texas and the Southwest soon. 
Reply
:iconmicrowavedreams:
microwavedreams Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2013
Would you say your 2nd renaissance timeline will go similarly to this? If yes, will there be a clear victor, as opposed to Friedman, who left it open?
Reply
:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Actually, the Second Renaissance has not one, but two out and out wars between the United States and Mexico at the end of the 21st Century and during the early 22nd Century. Friedman's projection paints it as a war over a borderland, in my timeline that is just the catalyst for a much larger conflict.
Reply
:iconmicrowavedreams:
microwavedreams Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013
That conflict being?
Reply
Add a Comment: