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2066: Fault Lines by YNot1989 2066: Fault Lines by YNot1989
More than Ten Years since the end of the Third World War, the United States enjoys an era of unprecedented prosperity, but it seems peace remains a goal that can never be reached. The Flood has finally come to an end, with the Earth Working Group's construction, or rather reconstruction, of a series of ancient rivers and lakes in the Sahara, and the refreezing of the polar caps via the Mars Solar Reflectors (now being deployed across the system to provide much needed sunlight to the Titan and Triton colonies), but the new water bodies and return to a cold north appear to have caused more wars than they stopped. 

The First Nations of the arctic circle originally left Canada on fairly good terms; Canada would gain access to arctic oil supplies without having to destroy their own natural beauty, and the First Nations got the independence and prosperity they had longed for. But with the refreezing of the polar caps, and the death of the oil industry thanks to space based energy sources, these prosperous nations were turned back into bankrupt tundras. To survive the First Nations allied to invade Canada's northern territories which were still warm enough to support some agriculture and industry (thanks in part to the Earth Working Group's "Rewilding" of the subarctic). The Arctic Nations had long prepared to defend their valuable oil supplies and funded a military buildup before the Refreeze. Canada and Quebec quickly found themselves being invaded by the First Nations. For the better part of a decade the US had occupied Cascadia and the Yukon in the hope to prevent any hostilities between the First Nations and the Canadians, and had no desire to face another invading power to their northern border. In 2065 the US entered the war with the Canadians and Quebecios. With America's entrance into the First Nations War, Canada had hoped that victory would be assured, but one year on, the United States's commitment is clearly marginal at best, as they fight mainly to keep the war from reaching American interests. This may change as the current Administration faces an impatient public in the 2066 midterms, but for now the American presidency has no desire to make its dominance of the former Anglosphere any more formal than necessary. 

Meanwhile in Africa the new freshwater rivers and lakes have spurred an economic boom as agriculture in the Sahara now becomes the new reality. Once marginalized peoples have used this opportunity to gain independence, often at the expense of nations that were already weakened during the Flood. The Turks provide a degree stability at their immediate periphery, but beyond that the chaos is too extreme for anyone to attempt to restore order. Despite this, the economies of the Sahara are blossoming with the land, and investors from Southern Europe are riding the coat-tails of this growth, saving themselves from Northern Europe's fate. Where Germany and France were once the economic engines of the Eurozone, they are now sad reminders of the death of the Eurocentric world. There was hope that Britain and Ireland would be repopulated after the flood, but with London looking like a drained reef, and more than a generation of Britains having known nothing but a life in the United States and Canada, it seems that whatever remains of these once great civilizations will soon be formal American territories.

While chaos reigns in the forgotten corners of the Earth, in space prosperity and peace live side by side. The wealth of the Outer Planets has grown with the demand for energy on Earth, and the construction of the Ecuador, Indonesian, and East African Space Elevators have opened Earth to more goods from the colonies than ever. Mars will be fit for permanent human habitation within 15 years, and Venus now supports the beginnings of an ocean. The Moon remains the refinery of the Solar System, as gasses from Jupiter and Saturn flow down system for a hungry society. Most of these resources flow thoughout the colonies and never make it to Earth due to the limited global infrastructure (by Colonial standards). The first warp drive capable probe, the Prometheus, has proven faster than light travel is possible, and in 2063 mankind took the next step with the launch of the Enterprise (because what else were they going to call it?) Warp Drive will not be fit for transporting the large masses that come with colonization, that task falls to the great O'Neil ships being built in the Belt and Jupiter to colonize Mars when the time comes. 


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:iconthetexasranger:
TheTexasRanger Featured By Owner 4 days ago
I know what the purpose of space elevators are but how are they built to be able to stand tall through several layers of the atmosphere?
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner 4 days ago  Hobbyist Digital Artist
They don't stand, they're under tension. A large counterweight station (originally an asteroid, but they've become large port-cities as time passed) keeps the elevator's strands under constant tension. The tower is really more like four or more cables in close proximity to provide support for the huge elevator car/building.
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:iconcoloanas:
Coloanas Featured By Owner 4 days ago  New member Hobbyist Artist
Is this based of Friedman's work, or your own?

First of all, Greenland will not go to US. 
There is a little chance of  Inner Mongolia going to Mongolia and China's other autonomous regions becoming independent (people already tried, but didn't suceed, considering a majority of the autonomous region's populations are still Han Chinese. 
If anything, US will NOT be a superpower no longer, while the world will see economic collapse in developed countries due to lower fertility rates and more dependency ratios. Most of the world's wealth will start to shift to Asia's and Africa's developing and newly industrializing nations. Also, you made Brazil and Argentina play nice with the rest of the continent. 

In my opinion, the world's superpowers will be either China or India, or perhaps, (if they merge together) ASEAN (Association of South East Asian nations). 
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner 4 days ago  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'd bother rebutting that first paragraph, but I've done it so much that it no longer provides any mental stimulation. Suffice to say you're wrong and I'm right.

As for China or India ever being superpowers (or merging, which is about the stupidest thing I've ever heard given their history), I don't doubt that they'll be important regional powers, but the era of superpowers has past and we're back to one dominant power and several smaller regional powers balanced off of each-other. 
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:iconcoloanas:
Coloanas Featured By Owner 4 days ago  New member Hobbyist Artist
So you're saying this is a multipolar world. But I still doubt America will retain its superpower status. 

Also I said ASEAN not India or China, might merge. 
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:iconynot1989:
YNot1989 Featured By Owner 4 days ago  Hobbyist Digital Artist
No, this is a world with America at the top and a number of alliance systems crafted to suit its needs, many of which intentionally designed to play off of each-other. Why do you think America is formally allied with India AND Pakistan.
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:iconcoloanas:
Coloanas Featured By Owner 3 days ago  New member Hobbyist Artist
I see.

But if America still has a global influence its has a superpower status, which its unlikely for it to retain for two centuries. It's either a multipolar world, with two or more superpowers, or a unipolar world, with China or India, being superpowers. 

Or is America a regional power in this scenario?
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:iconcoloanas:
Coloanas Featured By Owner 3 days ago  New member Hobbyist Artist
GLOBAL WARMING CANNOT HAPPEN OVER A FEW DECADES. IT IS PREDICTED ALTHOUGH THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE WILL RISE BY TWO DEGREES CENTIGRADE, THE SEA LEVEL WILL ONLY RISE BY 1.45 FEET. 
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:iconwaffle-republic:
Waffle-Republic Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Looks awesome :)
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:iconmicrowavedreams:
microwavedreams Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2014
Why is it that in your take on the Friedman scenario you portray a collapse of the Saudi Kingdom, while in this timeline you show the Arabian Peninsula to be a unified entity?
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